Skiing & Alpine Weather Information:
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Please click on the Snow-forecast.com logo below - this provides weather and snow reports on the main ski areas:

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Skiing

FMP properties are surrounded by the widest and best choice of both on and off-piste skiing in Europe.

FMP director Chris Harrop is one of the area's leading ski instructors and mountain guides.

Chris also organises and teaches high adventure skiing and technical developmant solutions for both individuals and groups through his British American Ski School in Val d'Isère (link below):

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The main ski areas are at Val d'Isère, which is linked to Tignes; Les Arcs and La Plagne, which are now joined together by a high speed cable car. Other ski areas are at Sainte Foy Ski Station and La Rosière.

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Sainte Foy has a relatively small number of pistes compared to the large ski areas and is ideal for beginners/intermediates or those wanting more relaxed skiing. It also has the advantage of being cheaper and less crowded at peak times than the main areas. For the more adventurous there are excellent off-piste areas, with the north face of La Foglietta, above Sainte Foy being both challenging and incredibly beautiful. In the Sainte Foy ski station there is a very good Ski and Snowboarding school and two hire shops. There is a new lift opening this season and more lifts and ski runs are planned for future seasons.

La Rosière is also a smaller ski area but it connects up with La Thuile on the Italian side of the Alps. This provides a good variety of skiing as well as the fun of skiing from France to Italy for a genuine Italian pizza or bowl of pasta for lunch.

Villaroger, near Ste Foy, has a car park and chair lift up to Les Arcs. This avoids the need to drive to Les Arcs and is a good way of beating crowds. The Villaroger area has beautiful forest pistes which are good to ski, particularly in poor weather when the trees provide both shelter and visual definition, with one of the longest runs in Europe descending over a possible 2,000m vertical drop.